Saturday, August 23, 2008

Postage Stamps

My grandmother made a lot of quilts. This one, a pattern called "Postage Stamp" (because the squares are the size of a postage stamp) - is one of her late ones, and one of the most complex. I think the most amazing thing about it isn't the thousands of fabric pieces, (nearly 10,000!) but the wondrous color harmonies. No two blocks use the same color combinations, yet the overall effect is harmonious.




7 comments:

William said...

Do you know if she made all the blocks of 36 (?) little pieces for the entire quilt first and then arranged them, or did she just start at one corner and piece every little block until the quilt was finished?

Dan Dutton said...

No, I don't know the method - but Phyllis does & I'll ask. I think these kind of patterns are made in diagonal lines. That makes sense - since it would be nigh on impossible to join the edges of these as blocks. I think there are about 75 postage stamps in each block, counting two sides of the white border - which means that there's a certain number on the outside border that I'm not counting - so the sum is something like 75 x 12 x 15.... now where did I leave that calculator?

Dan Dutton said...

15,000!

Apifera Farm said...

Amazing artists they were. Innate.

Pig and Peaches said...

I might be the only Dutton child to NOT own a Grandma quilt.
These are an intricate and important part of our legacy. I have never felt ownership was too important...these quilts just are...... I guess my best memories are the smell of soap and the soft touch of those worn fabrics against my skin when the quilts were given a spring washing.
I am glad Dan is finding their language. I always knew it existed.

Alan Evil said...

I've always loved that postage stamp quilt.

I can remember using one of those "old quilts" for a tent one summer.

Pig and Peaches said...

When I was a little girl, Sunday was the official day of rest. When the sun was beating down, we would spread those quilts out under a tree, after having fried chicken, green beans, corn and tomatoes for Sunday dinner( that would be lunch in then new language of meals)!
I remember wiggling around, waiting for Mom to let us go~~~Go to the woods, the creek, the pond for a swim...it was truly the lazy days of summer on Sunday. I think the staying there in the yard, being quiet, was her attempt at keeping us civilized.